Wednesday July 23, 2014

QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Survey results are meant for general information only, and are not based on recognised statistical methods.




The floods have returned

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The images are still fresh in our memories.

Water was released from local reservoirs at an astonishing and unprecedented rate. It rushed towards villages, municipalities, parks and tourist attractions, submerging and washing away all that was in its wake.

Other flood waters, generated by fall and winter snowfall and spring rains, lurched towards farms and communities.

It's been three years since the Flood of the Century struck southeast Saskatchewan. Many areas, such as Roche Percee, are still recovering. Others, such as tourist attractions, are only now returning to normal.

Water still surrounds Highway 39 between Macoun and Midale, a Florida Everglades-esque reminder of what happened in 2011. Lake Roy hasn't diminished northwest of Lampman.

Southeast Saskatchewan residents didn't need another reminder of Mother Nature's occasional rath. But we received one anyways, and now another area has to face the daunting twin prospects of clean-up and recovery.

Some areas in the far southeast corner received upwards of 200 millimetres of rain in late June. Two-thirds of the year's precipitation quota fell in 72 hours. Roads were left under water or were swept away. Fields were submerged and people wondered when the rain would end.

Gainsborough was evacuated, rendering Saskatchewan's oldest incorporated village a virtual ghost town. Carievale and Redvers were cut off because roads were flooded. Several communities declared a state of emergency.

Those who experienced the floods of three years ago thought they couldn't possibly happen again so quickly. The flood of 2014 was in a different part of the southeast, and they didn't involve massive amounts of water being released from a dam, but both floods are a testament to what can happen when you get too much precipitation in too little time.

They're also proof of Prairie residents' perseverance, resiliency and compassion.

Many Gainsborough residents spent their first night away from home camping out on the front lawns of friends and family in Carnduf, in a show of Saskatchewan hospitality. Volunteers worked long hours sand-bagging to keep the water at bay.

And while fields and homes might be under water now, you can be assured that the victims of this year's flood are already thinking of ways they can rebuild.

One of the enduring elements from the flood of 2011 was the way in which people wanted to help others through donations to charitable organizations, and other agencies dedicated to helping flood victims. The floods managed to bring out the best in most of us.

You can be sure that people will yearn to help others in any way possible. After all, it's the Saskatchewan way.

The nightmare returns

The images are still fresh in our memories.

Water was released from local reservoirs at an astonishing and unprecedented rate. It rushed towards villages, municipalities, parks and tourist attractions, submerging and washing away all that was in its wake.

Other flood waters, generated by fall and winter snowfall and spring rains, lurched towards farms and communities.

It's been three years since the Flood of the Century struck southeast Saskatchewan. Many areas, such as Roche Percee, are still recovering. Others, such as tourist attractions, are only now returning to normal.

Water still surrounds Highway 39 between Macoun and Midale, a Florida Everglades-esque reminder of what happened in 2011. Lake Roy hasn't diminished northwest of Lampman.

Southeast Saskatchewan residents didn't need another reminder of Mother Nature's occasional rath. But we received one anyways, and now another area has to face the daunting twin prospects of clean-up and recovery.

Some areas in the far southeast corner received upwards of 200 millimetres of rain in late June. Two-thirds of the year's precipitation quota fell in 72 hours. Roads were left under water or were swept away. Fields were submerged and people wondered when the rain would end.

Gainsborough was evacuated, rendering Saskatchewan's oldest incorporated village a virtual ghost town. Carievale and Redvers were cut off because roads were flooded. Several communities declared a state of emergency.

Those who experienced the floods of three years ago thought they couldn't possibly happen again so quickly. The flood of 2014 was in a different part of the southeast, and they didn't involve massive amounts of water being released from a dam, but both floods are a testament to what can happen when you get too much precipitation in too little time.

They're also proof of Prairie residents' perseverance, resiliency and compassion.

Many Gainsborough residents spent their first night away from home camping out on the front lawns of friends and family in Carnduf, in a show of Saskatchewan hospitality. Volunteers worked long hours sand-bagging to keep the water at bay.

And while fields and homes might be under water now, you can be assured that the victims of this year's flood are already thinking of ways they can rebuild.

One of the enduring elements from the flood of 2011 was the way in which people wanted to help others through donations to charitable organizations, and other agencies dedicated to helping flood victims. The floods managed to bring out the best in most of us.

You can be sure that people will yearn to help others in any way possible. After all, it's the Saskatchewan way.


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